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On the right track: the saga of the Regent Honeyeater
Introducing the Regent Honeyeater

Dean Ingwersen, the National Regent Honeyeater Recovery Coordinator at BirdLife Australia, gives an insight into efforts being made to stop the species from extinction.
The 2013 Captive release program at Chiltern in NE Victoria

Glen Johnson, from the Victorian Department of Environment and Primary Industries (DEPI), outlines an exciting program to monitor the release of captive bred Regent honeyeaters, a nationally endangered bird species. The captive release program is centred on the box ironbark vegetation within the Chiltern-Mt Pilot National Park, in NE Victoria.
Week 18 of the 2013 Captive Release

The 2013 captive release at Chiltern was timed to coincide with a major flowering event that take place every two to three years in Box Ironbark forests that dominate the region. Glen Johnson updates outcomes following 18 weeks of community based monitoring of the release of the birds into. the wild.
November 2013: people power released

Glen Johnson, from the Victorian Department of Environment and Primary Industries, discusses the latest release into the wild of Regent honeyeaters bred in captivity. Thirty seven Regent honeyeaters, all reared in captivity at Sydney’s Taronga Zoo, were released into Chiltern Mt Pilot National Park, NE Victoria in April 2013. Monitoring has now past 210 days, a world first for the Regent program.
 

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